/page/2

stephnrice:

glassmountain:

stfuconservatives:

nextyearsgirl:

This is an enormous chain and I’m sorry, but I need to say this:

The laws in the Old Testament were set forth by god as the rules the Hebrews needed to follow in order to be righteous, to atone for the sin of Adam and Eve and to be able to get into Heaven. That is also why they were required to make sacrifices, because it was part of the appeasement for Original Sin.

According to Christian theology, when Jesus came from Heaven, it was for the express purpose of sacrificing himself on the cross so that our sins may be forgiven. His sacrifice was supposed to be the ultimate act that would free us from the former laws and regulations and allow us to enter Heaven by acting in his image. That is why he said “it is finished” when he died on the cross. That is why Christians don’t have to circumcise their sons (god’s covenant with Jacob), that is why they don’t have to perform animal sacrifice, or grow out their forelocks, or follow any of the other laws of Leviticus.

When you quote Leviticus as god’s law and say they are rules we must follow because they are what god or Jesus wants us to do, what you are really saying, as a Christian, is that Christ’s sacrifice on the cross was invalid. He died in vain because you believe we are still beholden to the old laws. That is what you, a self-professed good Christian, are saying to your god and his son, that their plan for your salvation wasn’t good enough for you.

So maybe actually read the thing before you start quoting it, because the implications of your actions go a lot deeper than you think.

/An atheist who understands Christian theology better than Bible-thumpers do.

^

(mic drop)

boom

whoa.

Though you are right in saying that, it’s not the complete story.  Old laws were washed away, and killing people because they were sinners is not the way Christians are supposed to go about doing things.  However, the Bible says that Jesus is the Living Word, meaning Word of God, and it does state after his death on the cross that homosexuality is a sin.  That doesn’t mean that Christians should go around persecuting anyone, but that cannot be ignored.  It’s your prerogative to not believe that homosexuality is a sin, and it’s a Christian’s to believe that it is.  This shouldn’t be a debate.  What should be said is, “How can we coexist with our different views on the world?”  Respect one another and move on.

(Source: drunkonstephen, via theedjcagedbird)

Music Video Bloopers II

HAAAAAAA

(Source: janetney, via floacist)

nativeamericannews:

 Philthy: City of Brotherly Love Makes Offensive Name Worse, Much Worse
Really, Philly? After the Philadelphia Phillies were clobbered by the Cleveland Indians yesterday, 14-2, the Philadelphia Daily News took to offensive puns today to sell copy.

Damn, why did it have to be my city?

nativeamericannews:

Philthy: City of Brotherly Love Makes Offensive Name Worse, Much Worse

Really, Philly? After the Philadelphia Phillies were clobbered by the Cleveland Indians yesterday, 14-2, the Philadelphia Daily News took to offensive puns today to sell copy.

Damn, why did it have to be my city?

(via jalwhite)

charmandtheory:

The song sampled from ms. fat booty

(I definitely didn’t know this! Thanks for putting me on game) 

(via caliphorniaqueen)


Akasha and Lestat make their grand entrance, Jesse goes towards them saying “Lestat, what has she done to you?” and Akasha gives her this ‘bitch, you better step off before I eat your face’ look.

Akasha and Lestat make their grand entrance, Jesse goes towards them saying “Lestat, what has she done to you?” and Akasha gives her this ‘bitch, you better step off before I eat your face’ look.

(Source: hs-gifs, via oncloudn9ne)

creolesoul:

A History of Black people in Europe

It is generally known that black people have been residing in European countries since the early colonial times. But even before the 15th century and during Roman times, a time when colour of skin still wasn’t a racist stigma but just another physical feature, black people lived in Europe. Remains of a man with black African features were found in England recently, dating his life back to the 13th century. Read this article for more info.


Besides that, facts have been found of black people living in different parts of Europe, although I don’t want to overstate their presence or influence. But it is generally known that during the Muslim era of the Iberian Peninsula (from the 8th century AD until the 15th century AD) people with dark skin were part of daily live. The Muslims who invaded Spain and Portugal around 700 AD were a mixture of black and dark people from North-Africa. They were often referred to as Maures, wrote about and painted, way before the dehumanization of black people started. I added above Jan Mostaert’s portrait of a nobleman, guest of the Queen of Austria. This painting dates back to the early 1500’s in what we now call Belgium, then part of the Duchy of Brabant. There is no doubt this man has African roots while being a respected member of European culture. We can only guess that this man is of Maure origin, i.e. a Muslim having converted to Christianity or even the second or third generation of converts. Below I will go deeper into the subject. I will give you some internet links, book references and a list of early Europeans of African descent, each time linked to their wiki page. If you know more about the subject I invite you to add information in a comment.Al AndalusMany blacks who were Muslims converted to Christianity after the emirate ofAl Andalus was abolished (end of 15th century). But the Reconquista took centuries (8th-15th century) and during those times black people gradually integrated the Christian and Northern European world. Among them were noble men and scholars. The negative image of blacks, as natural slaves, only gained prominence in the 18th century when the transatlantic slave trade became a central piece of European economical activity and later when European nation-states were being established. Slavery and racismOf course slavery existed before racism. In the 15th century blacks and whites were enslaved indiscriminately. Blacks in the America’s could become free men and own their own slaves and land (which was rather common in colonial Brazil for instance). It is only in later years that being black made you a slave forever and by birth, or at least a kind of human always inferior to white people. This racial perspective on identity and humanity only gained authority in later modern times. Read more on the subject here.Coat of ArmsBlack people were part of European imagination and reality from very early times. Read more here and here. We can say with certainty that there were black people in Europe before that white people reached the area south of the Sahara. North Africa, Iberia and the Middle East were the crossroad where black and white intermingled. In Europe references to blacks was a positive sign of strength and military power. Still today you can find many blacks in coat of arms for towns all over Europe, central, south and north, dating back to the middle ages. Some LiteratureAfter the 15th century, Portugal entered an intense relationship with African kingdoms in the Gulf of Guinea and the Congo coasts. Slave trade (although not based on race) and exchange between the kings led to the presence of Europeans on the West- and Central African shores, just as Africans in Portugal. Accounts from those days tell us that the sight of black people in the streets of Lisbon wasn’t a rarity during the Middle Ages, more on the contrary. I want to refer to following books for those who want to know more about this topic: Black Africans in Renaissance Europe, Thomas Foster Earle,K. J. P. Lowe(eds.)Africa’s discovery of Europe, David Northrup As a consequence of the slave trade free blacks also arrived in Europe between the 16th and 19th century. Blacks lived in London, Liverpool, Lisbon, Seville, … during the 17th and 18th century. Other historical books with scientific authority give you in depth knowledge of this:Hugh Thomas’s ‘The Slave Trade’Ivan Van Sertima’s ‘African Presence in Early Europe’All this publications teach us something about this hidden part of European history.Leo AfricanusLeo Africanus is often stated as one of these black and European noble men and scholars. But it is rather speculation to state if he was black or white. He was definitely a Maure but as racism, whiteness and blackness were unknown concepts as we know it today, we can’t know his ‘race’ for sure. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. Even very common socio-cultural concepts of today such as ‘French’, ‘German’ or ‘English’ didn’t exist in those days such that it would be silly to argue whether historical figures of those days were German or French. Same thing is valid for the white and black race as defined today. Famous Europeans with African ancestry (1500-1900)Below I will list some of the most famous figures of European modern history (after 1500) who happened to be black or have African ancestry, but were integral parts of European (high) society. Most of the time the African ancestry of these people is ignored by history books although acknowledged and accepted by most history scholars. I think it throws a new light on the concepts of race and the meaning of blackness in the 21st century. Alessandro ‘il Moro’ de Medici 1510-1537 Duke of FlorenceAbram Petrovich Ganibal 1696-1781 Major-general, military engineer, governor of Reval and nobleman of the Russian EmpireAnton Wilhelm Amo 1700-1775 German PhilosopherIgnatius Sancho 1729–1780 Author and abolitionist, UKOlaudah Equiano a.k.a. Gustavus Vassa 1745-1797Author and abolitionist, UKChevalier de Saint Georges 1745-1799A famous musican, composer and swardsman of his timesListen to his music here. Thomas Alexandre Dumas 1762-1806A general of the French RevolutionGeorge Polgreen Bridgetower 1780-1860Musician and composerListen and watch here Alexandre Pushkin 1799-1837Famous author, great-grandson of Abraham Petrovich GanibalAlexandre Dumas 1802-1870 French author of the world famous tale of ‘The Three Musketeers’, Thomas Alexandre Dumas’s sonJohn Archer 1863-1931 Presumably UK’s first black mayor, political activistSamuel Coleridge-Taylor 1875-1912Musician and composerListen to his music here
(via afroeurope.blogspot.nl)

creolesoul:

A History of Black people in Europe

It is generally known that black people have been residing in European countries since the early colonial times. But even before the 15th century and during Roman times, a time when colour of skin still wasn’t a racist stigma but just another physical feature, black people lived in Europe. Remains of a man with black African features were found in England recently, dating his life back to the 13th century. Read this article for more info.


Besides that, facts have been found of black people living in different parts of Europe, although I don’t want to overstate their presence or influence. But it is generally known that during the Muslim era of the Iberian Peninsula (from the 8th century AD until the 15th century AD) people with dark skin were part of daily live. The Muslims who invaded Spain and Portugal around 700 AD were a mixture of black and dark people from North-Africa. They were often referred to as Maures, wrote about and painted, way before the dehumanization of black people started. 

I added above Jan Mostaert’s portrait of a nobleman, guest of the Queen of Austria. This painting dates back to the early 1500’s in what we now call Belgium, then part of the Duchy of Brabant. There is no doubt this man has African roots while being a respected member of European culture. We can only guess that this man is of Maure origin, i.e. a Muslim having converted to Christianity or even the second or third generation of converts. 

Below I will go deeper into the subject. I will give you some internet links, book references and a list of early Europeans of African descent, each time linked to their wiki page. If you know more about the subject I invite you to add information in a comment.


Al Andalus


Many blacks who were Muslims converted to Christianity after the emirate ofAl Andalus was abolished (end of 15th century). But the Reconquista took centuries (8th-15th century) and during those times black people gradually integrated the Christian and Northern European world. Among them were noble men and scholars. The negative image of blacks, as natural slaves, only gained prominence in the 18th century when the transatlantic slave trade became a central piece of European economical activity and later when European nation-states were being established. 

Slavery and racism

Of course slavery existed before racism. In the 15th century blacks and whites were enslaved indiscriminately. Blacks in the America’s could become free men and own their own slaves and land (which was rather common in colonial Brazil for instance). It is only in later years that being black made you a slave forever and by birth, or at least a kind of human always inferior to white people. This racial perspective on identity and humanity only gained authority in later modern times. Read more on the subject here.

Coat of Arms

Black people were part of European imagination and reality from very early times. Read more here and here. We can say with certainty that there were black people in Europe before that white people reached the area south of the Sahara. North Africa, Iberia and the Middle East were the crossroad where black and white intermingled. In Europe references to blacks was a positive sign of strength and military power. Still today you can find many blacks in coat of arms for towns all over Europe, central, south and north, dating back to the middle ages. 



Some Literature

After the 15th century, Portugal entered an intense relationship with African kingdoms in the Gulf of Guinea and the Congo coasts. Slave trade (although not based on race) and exchange between the kings led to the presence of Europeans on the West- and Central African shores, just as Africans in Portugal. Accounts from those days tell us that the sight of black people in the streets of Lisbon wasn’t a rarity during the Middle Ages, more on the contrary. I want to refer to following books for those who want to know more about this topic: 
Black Africans in Renaissance Europe, Thomas Foster Earle,K. J. P. Lowe(eds.)
Africa’s discovery of Europe, David Northrup 

As a consequence of the slave trade free blacks also arrived in Europe between the 16th and 19th century. Blacks lived in London, Liverpool, Lisbon, Seville, … during the 17th and 18th century. Other historical books with scientific authority give you in depth knowledge of this:
Hugh Thomas’s ‘The Slave Trade’
Ivan Van Sertima’s ‘African Presence in Early Europe’
All this publications teach us something about this hidden part of European history.

Leo Africanus

Leo Africanus is often stated as one of these black and European noble men and scholars. But it is rather speculation to state if he was black or white. He was definitely a Maure but as racism, whiteness and blackness were unknown concepts as we know it today, we can’t know his ‘race’ for sure. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. Even very common socio-cultural concepts of today such as ‘French’, ‘German’ or ‘English’ didn’t exist in those days such that it would be silly to argue whether historical figures of those days were German or French. Same thing is valid for the white and black race as defined today. 

Famous Europeans with African ancestry (1500-1900)

Below I will list some of the most famous figures of European modern history (after 1500) who happened to be black or have African ancestry, but were integral parts of European (high) society. Most of the time the African ancestry of these people is ignored by history books although acknowledged and accepted by most history scholars. I think it throws a new light on the concepts of race and the meaning of blackness in the 21st century. 

Alessandro ‘il Moro’ de Medici 1510-1537 
Duke of Florence


Abram Petrovich Ganibal 1696-1781
 
Major-general, military engineer, governor of Reval and nobleman of the Russian Empire


Anton Wilhelm Amo 1700-1775 

German Philosopher


Ignatius Sancho 1729–1780
 
Author and abolitionist, UK

Olaudah Equiano a.k.a. Gustavus Vassa 1745-1797Author and abolitionist, UK

Chevalier de Saint Georges 1745-1799A famous musican, composer and swardsman of his times
Listen to his music here

Thomas Alexandre Dumas 1762-1806A general of the French Revolution

George Polgreen Bridgetower 1780-1860Musician and composer
Listen and watch here 


Alexandre Pushkin 1799-1837

Famous author, great-grandson of Abraham Petrovich Ganibal

Alexandre Dumas 1802-1870 
French author of the world famous tale of ‘The Three Musketeers’, Thomas Alexandre Dumas’s son

John Archer 1863-1931 
Presumably UK’s first black mayor, political activist

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor 1875-1912Musician and composer
Listen to his music here

(via afroeurope.blogspot.nl)

(via diasporicroots)

caliphorniaqueen:

docdidit:

bl4ckhippie:

hahahahahahahahahhahahahahahahahakbfluywfvofvo23rvcueqry3yh3

Lmao

but it looks like he’s looking past her ass, and everyone behind him seems to be looking in the same direction.

caliphorniaqueen:

docdidit:

bl4ckhippie:

hahahahahahahahahhahahahahahahahakbfluywfvofvo23rvcueqry3yh3

Lmao

but it looks like he’s looking past her ass, and everyone behind him seems to be looking in the same direction.

(Source: ifitness504)

stephnrice:

glassmountain:

stfuconservatives:

nextyearsgirl:

This is an enormous chain and I’m sorry, but I need to say this:

The laws in the Old Testament were set forth by god as the rules the Hebrews needed to follow in order to be righteous, to atone for the sin of Adam and Eve and to be able to get into Heaven. That is also why they were required to make sacrifices, because it was part of the appeasement for Original Sin.

According to Christian theology, when Jesus came from Heaven, it was for the express purpose of sacrificing himself on the cross so that our sins may be forgiven. His sacrifice was supposed to be the ultimate act that would free us from the former laws and regulations and allow us to enter Heaven by acting in his image. That is why he said “it is finished” when he died on the cross. That is why Christians don’t have to circumcise their sons (god’s covenant with Jacob), that is why they don’t have to perform animal sacrifice, or grow out their forelocks, or follow any of the other laws of Leviticus.

When you quote Leviticus as god’s law and say they are rules we must follow because they are what god or Jesus wants us to do, what you are really saying, as a Christian, is that Christ’s sacrifice on the cross was invalid. He died in vain because you believe we are still beholden to the old laws. That is what you, a self-professed good Christian, are saying to your god and his son, that their plan for your salvation wasn’t good enough for you.

So maybe actually read the thing before you start quoting it, because the implications of your actions go a lot deeper than you think.

/An atheist who understands Christian theology better than Bible-thumpers do.

^

(mic drop)

boom

whoa.

Though you are right in saying that, it’s not the complete story.  Old laws were washed away, and killing people because they were sinners is not the way Christians are supposed to go about doing things.  However, the Bible says that Jesus is the Living Word, meaning Word of God, and it does state after his death on the cross that homosexuality is a sin.  That doesn’t mean that Christians should go around persecuting anyone, but that cannot be ignored.  It’s your prerogative to not believe that homosexuality is a sin, and it’s a Christian’s to believe that it is.  This shouldn’t be a debate.  What should be said is, “How can we coexist with our different views on the world?”  Respect one another and move on.

(Source: drunkonstephen, via theedjcagedbird)

Music Video Bloopers II

HAAAAAAA

(Source: janetney, via floacist)

nativeamericannews:

 Philthy: City of Brotherly Love Makes Offensive Name Worse, Much Worse
Really, Philly? After the Philadelphia Phillies were clobbered by the Cleveland Indians yesterday, 14-2, the Philadelphia Daily News took to offensive puns today to sell copy.

Damn, why did it have to be my city?

nativeamericannews:

Philthy: City of Brotherly Love Makes Offensive Name Worse, Much Worse

Really, Philly? After the Philadelphia Phillies were clobbered by the Cleveland Indians yesterday, 14-2, the Philadelphia Daily News took to offensive puns today to sell copy.

Damn, why did it have to be my city?

(via jalwhite)

charmandtheory:

The song sampled from ms. fat booty

(I definitely didn’t know this! Thanks for putting me on game) 

(via caliphorniaqueen)


Akasha and Lestat make their grand entrance, Jesse goes towards them saying “Lestat, what has she done to you?” and Akasha gives her this ‘bitch, you better step off before I eat your face’ look.

Akasha and Lestat make their grand entrance, Jesse goes towards them saying “Lestat, what has she done to you?” and Akasha gives her this ‘bitch, you better step off before I eat your face’ look.

(Source: hs-gifs, via oncloudn9ne)

creolesoul:

A History of Black people in Europe

It is generally known that black people have been residing in European countries since the early colonial times. But even before the 15th century and during Roman times, a time when colour of skin still wasn’t a racist stigma but just another physical feature, black people lived in Europe. Remains of a man with black African features were found in England recently, dating his life back to the 13th century. Read this article for more info.


Besides that, facts have been found of black people living in different parts of Europe, although I don’t want to overstate their presence or influence. But it is generally known that during the Muslim era of the Iberian Peninsula (from the 8th century AD until the 15th century AD) people with dark skin were part of daily live. The Muslims who invaded Spain and Portugal around 700 AD were a mixture of black and dark people from North-Africa. They were often referred to as Maures, wrote about and painted, way before the dehumanization of black people started. I added above Jan Mostaert’s portrait of a nobleman, guest of the Queen of Austria. This painting dates back to the early 1500’s in what we now call Belgium, then part of the Duchy of Brabant. There is no doubt this man has African roots while being a respected member of European culture. We can only guess that this man is of Maure origin, i.e. a Muslim having converted to Christianity or even the second or third generation of converts. Below I will go deeper into the subject. I will give you some internet links, book references and a list of early Europeans of African descent, each time linked to their wiki page. If you know more about the subject I invite you to add information in a comment.Al AndalusMany blacks who were Muslims converted to Christianity after the emirate ofAl Andalus was abolished (end of 15th century). But the Reconquista took centuries (8th-15th century) and during those times black people gradually integrated the Christian and Northern European world. Among them were noble men and scholars. The negative image of blacks, as natural slaves, only gained prominence in the 18th century when the transatlantic slave trade became a central piece of European economical activity and later when European nation-states were being established. Slavery and racismOf course slavery existed before racism. In the 15th century blacks and whites were enslaved indiscriminately. Blacks in the America’s could become free men and own their own slaves and land (which was rather common in colonial Brazil for instance). It is only in later years that being black made you a slave forever and by birth, or at least a kind of human always inferior to white people. This racial perspective on identity and humanity only gained authority in later modern times. Read more on the subject here.Coat of ArmsBlack people were part of European imagination and reality from very early times. Read more here and here. We can say with certainty that there were black people in Europe before that white people reached the area south of the Sahara. North Africa, Iberia and the Middle East were the crossroad where black and white intermingled. In Europe references to blacks was a positive sign of strength and military power. Still today you can find many blacks in coat of arms for towns all over Europe, central, south and north, dating back to the middle ages. Some LiteratureAfter the 15th century, Portugal entered an intense relationship with African kingdoms in the Gulf of Guinea and the Congo coasts. Slave trade (although not based on race) and exchange between the kings led to the presence of Europeans on the West- and Central African shores, just as Africans in Portugal. Accounts from those days tell us that the sight of black people in the streets of Lisbon wasn’t a rarity during the Middle Ages, more on the contrary. I want to refer to following books for those who want to know more about this topic: Black Africans in Renaissance Europe, Thomas Foster Earle,K. J. P. Lowe(eds.)Africa’s discovery of Europe, David Northrup As a consequence of the slave trade free blacks also arrived in Europe between the 16th and 19th century. Blacks lived in London, Liverpool, Lisbon, Seville, … during the 17th and 18th century. Other historical books with scientific authority give you in depth knowledge of this:Hugh Thomas’s ‘The Slave Trade’Ivan Van Sertima’s ‘African Presence in Early Europe’All this publications teach us something about this hidden part of European history.Leo AfricanusLeo Africanus is often stated as one of these black and European noble men and scholars. But it is rather speculation to state if he was black or white. He was definitely a Maure but as racism, whiteness and blackness were unknown concepts as we know it today, we can’t know his ‘race’ for sure. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. Even very common socio-cultural concepts of today such as ‘French’, ‘German’ or ‘English’ didn’t exist in those days such that it would be silly to argue whether historical figures of those days were German or French. Same thing is valid for the white and black race as defined today. Famous Europeans with African ancestry (1500-1900)Below I will list some of the most famous figures of European modern history (after 1500) who happened to be black or have African ancestry, but were integral parts of European (high) society. Most of the time the African ancestry of these people is ignored by history books although acknowledged and accepted by most history scholars. I think it throws a new light on the concepts of race and the meaning of blackness in the 21st century. Alessandro ‘il Moro’ de Medici 1510-1537 Duke of FlorenceAbram Petrovich Ganibal 1696-1781 Major-general, military engineer, governor of Reval and nobleman of the Russian EmpireAnton Wilhelm Amo 1700-1775 German PhilosopherIgnatius Sancho 1729–1780 Author and abolitionist, UKOlaudah Equiano a.k.a. Gustavus Vassa 1745-1797Author and abolitionist, UKChevalier de Saint Georges 1745-1799A famous musican, composer and swardsman of his timesListen to his music here. Thomas Alexandre Dumas 1762-1806A general of the French RevolutionGeorge Polgreen Bridgetower 1780-1860Musician and composerListen and watch here Alexandre Pushkin 1799-1837Famous author, great-grandson of Abraham Petrovich GanibalAlexandre Dumas 1802-1870 French author of the world famous tale of ‘The Three Musketeers’, Thomas Alexandre Dumas’s sonJohn Archer 1863-1931 Presumably UK’s first black mayor, political activistSamuel Coleridge-Taylor 1875-1912Musician and composerListen to his music here
(via afroeurope.blogspot.nl)

creolesoul:

A History of Black people in Europe

It is generally known that black people have been residing in European countries since the early colonial times. But even before the 15th century and during Roman times, a time when colour of skin still wasn’t a racist stigma but just another physical feature, black people lived in Europe. Remains of a man with black African features were found in England recently, dating his life back to the 13th century. Read this article for more info.


Besides that, facts have been found of black people living in different parts of Europe, although I don’t want to overstate their presence or influence. But it is generally known that during the Muslim era of the Iberian Peninsula (from the 8th century AD until the 15th century AD) people with dark skin were part of daily live. The Muslims who invaded Spain and Portugal around 700 AD were a mixture of black and dark people from North-Africa. They were often referred to as Maures, wrote about and painted, way before the dehumanization of black people started. 

I added above Jan Mostaert’s portrait of a nobleman, guest of the Queen of Austria. This painting dates back to the early 1500’s in what we now call Belgium, then part of the Duchy of Brabant. There is no doubt this man has African roots while being a respected member of European culture. We can only guess that this man is of Maure origin, i.e. a Muslim having converted to Christianity or even the second or third generation of converts. 

Below I will go deeper into the subject. I will give you some internet links, book references and a list of early Europeans of African descent, each time linked to their wiki page. If you know more about the subject I invite you to add information in a comment.


Al Andalus


Many blacks who were Muslims converted to Christianity after the emirate ofAl Andalus was abolished (end of 15th century). But the Reconquista took centuries (8th-15th century) and during those times black people gradually integrated the Christian and Northern European world. Among them were noble men and scholars. The negative image of blacks, as natural slaves, only gained prominence in the 18th century when the transatlantic slave trade became a central piece of European economical activity and later when European nation-states were being established. 

Slavery and racism

Of course slavery existed before racism. In the 15th century blacks and whites were enslaved indiscriminately. Blacks in the America’s could become free men and own their own slaves and land (which was rather common in colonial Brazil for instance). It is only in later years that being black made you a slave forever and by birth, or at least a kind of human always inferior to white people. This racial perspective on identity and humanity only gained authority in later modern times. Read more on the subject here.

Coat of Arms

Black people were part of European imagination and reality from very early times. Read more here and here. We can say with certainty that there were black people in Europe before that white people reached the area south of the Sahara. North Africa, Iberia and the Middle East were the crossroad where black and white intermingled. In Europe references to blacks was a positive sign of strength and military power. Still today you can find many blacks in coat of arms for towns all over Europe, central, south and north, dating back to the middle ages. 



Some Literature

After the 15th century, Portugal entered an intense relationship with African kingdoms in the Gulf of Guinea and the Congo coasts. Slave trade (although not based on race) and exchange between the kings led to the presence of Europeans on the West- and Central African shores, just as Africans in Portugal. Accounts from those days tell us that the sight of black people in the streets of Lisbon wasn’t a rarity during the Middle Ages, more on the contrary. I want to refer to following books for those who want to know more about this topic: 
Black Africans in Renaissance Europe, Thomas Foster Earle,K. J. P. Lowe(eds.)
Africa’s discovery of Europe, David Northrup 

As a consequence of the slave trade free blacks also arrived in Europe between the 16th and 19th century. Blacks lived in London, Liverpool, Lisbon, Seville, … during the 17th and 18th century. Other historical books with scientific authority give you in depth knowledge of this:
Hugh Thomas’s ‘The Slave Trade’
Ivan Van Sertima’s ‘African Presence in Early Europe’
All this publications teach us something about this hidden part of European history.

Leo Africanus

Leo Africanus is often stated as one of these black and European noble men and scholars. But it is rather speculation to state if he was black or white. He was definitely a Maure but as racism, whiteness and blackness were unknown concepts as we know it today, we can’t know his ‘race’ for sure. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. Even very common socio-cultural concepts of today such as ‘French’, ‘German’ or ‘English’ didn’t exist in those days such that it would be silly to argue whether historical figures of those days were German or French. Same thing is valid for the white and black race as defined today. 

Famous Europeans with African ancestry (1500-1900)

Below I will list some of the most famous figures of European modern history (after 1500) who happened to be black or have African ancestry, but were integral parts of European (high) society. Most of the time the African ancestry of these people is ignored by history books although acknowledged and accepted by most history scholars. I think it throws a new light on the concepts of race and the meaning of blackness in the 21st century. 

Alessandro ‘il Moro’ de Medici 1510-1537 
Duke of Florence


Abram Petrovich Ganibal 1696-1781
 
Major-general, military engineer, governor of Reval and nobleman of the Russian Empire


Anton Wilhelm Amo 1700-1775 

German Philosopher


Ignatius Sancho 1729–1780
 
Author and abolitionist, UK

Olaudah Equiano a.k.a. Gustavus Vassa 1745-1797Author and abolitionist, UK

Chevalier de Saint Georges 1745-1799A famous musican, composer and swardsman of his times
Listen to his music here

Thomas Alexandre Dumas 1762-1806A general of the French Revolution

George Polgreen Bridgetower 1780-1860Musician and composer
Listen and watch here 


Alexandre Pushkin 1799-1837

Famous author, great-grandson of Abraham Petrovich Ganibal

Alexandre Dumas 1802-1870 
French author of the world famous tale of ‘The Three Musketeers’, Thomas Alexandre Dumas’s son

John Archer 1863-1931 
Presumably UK’s first black mayor, political activist

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor 1875-1912Musician and composer
Listen to his music here

(via afroeurope.blogspot.nl)

(via diasporicroots)

(Source: deadthehype, via oncloudn9ne)

(Source: eyebrowgod, via oncloudn9ne)

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

Bruce

Seriously

TOO SOON

(via ruinedchildhood)

caliphorniaqueen:

docdidit:

bl4ckhippie:

hahahahahahahahahhahahahahahahahakbfluywfvofvo23rvcueqry3yh3

Lmao

but it looks like he’s looking past her ass, and everyone behind him seems to be looking in the same direction.

caliphorniaqueen:

docdidit:

bl4ckhippie:

hahahahahahahahahhahahahahahahahakbfluywfvofvo23rvcueqry3yh3

Lmao

but it looks like he’s looking past her ass, and everyone behind him seems to be looking in the same direction.

(Source: ifitness504)

About:

Young. Black. Native American. Christian. Artist. Outspoken. Pensive. Happy. Blessed. This is a blog about what goes through my head and what I like.

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